Knees – not just getting old? #27 – Last entry (for now), including summary

A couple of days after posting my previous blog , I spoke to John about the possibility of him measuring me up for my insoles, as it seemed they now needed replacing (see blog #26).  He felt it would be best for him to pass on doing this, as it’s a little outside his realm of experience and his qualifications.  So I contacted the company that make the insoles I have worn for the last 6 1/2 years, to see who they might recommend instead.  They put me onto a highly qualified orthotics practitioner they have worked closely with for the last 2 years or so, to jointly develop a new kind of long-lasting insole which that practitioner has designed.  I saw this other person a few days ago, on 26 April, and the appointment ended up going in what I would describe as an unexpected direction, though a highly positive one.  But that is another story…

Looking back at the work that physio John and I have done together since I first came to see him in late October 2016,  it has been highly fruitful, to say the least.  When we started treatment at that time, running or playing table tennis – even for just a few minutes – made my left knee joint quite sore, the knee would get quite stiff when I sat down even for short periods, and my walking gait had somehow developed a strange limp on that leg, one that was most pronounced when walking downhill.  In effect I was unable to run, and I was especially worried that I might have to abandon running permanently.

From the first session John and I had together, my objectives for our work included eventually being able to resume running again, to my usual distance of 4 miles and to be done once every 3 days, and to be able to play table tennis – all with no soreness issues either during or after a run / table tennis – and to be able to walk without any limp, including up- and downhill as well as on the flat.  We have more than achieved these targets, and I am 100% satisfied with the outcomes.

Along the way during the treatment period, I had 8 sessions with John.  We covered and addressed a wide range of potential causes of the knee joint issues that I had been suffering from since before first seeing him.  With hindsight, it is now clear that many of these potential causes were making at least some contribution to the knee problems, so it was down to much more than there being just a single thing behind it.  Had any of these causes not been addressed, I don’t think I would have been successful in the attempt to resume running again.

In summary of all of my previous blog pages #01 through #26, the things we/I did as part of our work together, and as a result of it, include the following:

  • A] John carried out various “range of motion” checks, on each leg for comparison, as well as other checks.  We did this in various of our sessions, and the results indicated eventual improvements and progress along the way.  Examining me freshly was invaluable in assessing direction of travel, expected durations of recovery, and so on.
  • B] I bought a MOTI foam roller, to replace an inferior one I had previously bought from a high street “chain” sports store.
  • C] We looked at my posture for sitting at the computer, in some depth.  John showed me how to sit properly, and once he had arranged my posture so it was “correct”, he photographed the result.  This photo became a benchmark I could refer to in other tasks we carried out, and as I sat working at the computer at home.  I even used this photo to measure the angle of my upper legs from the horizontal, using nothing more sophisticated than Microsoft Word and some simple geometry.
  • D] I undertook doing a major overhaul of my home computer workstation setup, where I have been making a living as a freelance Microsoft Excel spreadsheet developer for the last 18 months.  We both strongly suspected that this setup was a major culprit in my knee issues, which had only started up since I began working from home and sitting at it for a total of the usual sorts of working hours each day, sometimes more hours than that, etc.  Before that switch to home working, I had been running the same 4 miles every 3 days for some 14 years, with no problems of any kind – so even though we did not discount the usual things like poor running form etc as possible reasons for these knee issues showing up after all that time, we were on the lookout for other causes as well.  Altogether, the overhaul to my home workstation involved:
    • i) a shift from not having enough room to stretch out both legs underneath the desk and thus sitting at it at a “skewed” angle, to clearing away some IT equipment that had been stored under the desk, by adding strength to an existing shelf found out of the way and under the desk, making more room on that shelf, and putting the IT equipment on it;
    • ii) lowering the height of the desk so it was closer to a standard desk height in most offices;
    • iii) adding a “top of desk extension” so there was now enough desk “depth” and room to rest my elbows on it while using the computer keyboard (resting the elbows is an approach that was a completely new experience for me);
    • iv) replacing the old chair I had originally had leg extensions made up for – to accommodate my previous sitting position, which was quite high – with a spare chair from John’s  MOTI treatment room that he offered to sell to me, a chair which:
      • a} has more “depth” front to back and so provides better support for my long legs;
      • b} is of a more standard height as in most offices, and which;
      • c} when sat in properly following all these changes to the workstation setup – including v) below – results in my lower arms naturally resting in the perfect horizontal position, while I work;
    • v) adding a towel folded into 8 layers to the chair, positioned so the pelvis ends up a bit higher than the knees.
  • E] We took film of my walking and running gaits in the MOTI store – in more than 1 of our various sessions – and we worked on improving my general posture for both walking and running.
  • F] We fixed some ankle turn-in on the affected left leg, which had showed up on the films of me running.  In the end this appears to mostly have been from using running shoes that were quite worn out, as they were over 5 years old.  I bought a new pair at MOTI, and when we filmed me running in those, the ankle turn-in was gone.
  • G] John showed me various exercises, including some to target the glute muscles and get them working more properly.  I have incorporated all of these as shown, into my usual daily routine of morning exercises, and am still doing them today.
  • H] When the knee did not seem to be responding much to our early work from the first few weeks of treatment, I saw my GP.  To his credit, was willing to send me for an x-ray on the knee.  When this eventually did not show anything abnormal, my GP did not hesitate to send me for an MRC scan on it as well.  This proved to be very helpful in my treatment work with John, and it also demonstrated that it is possible for the NHS and a private practitioner to co-operate and work together to the benefit of the patient.
  • I] Between the x-ray and the MRI scan as outlined in the previous item, a “breakthrough” event took place in early December 2016 (see blog #14), after which the limp I had had when walking, which was most apparent when walking downhill , completely disappeared.  Although John and I were left a bit puzzled as to just what had taken place, and why, it was very good news, and as well as never seeing the limp again since then, the knee has also been improving ever since.  When the MRI scan results finally came in and I next saw John, he gave me new exercises to target the smaller joint on the outside of the knee, the “tibiofibular joint”, an area the scan had indicated was involved in the ongoing issues.  The scan suggested the main joint was more or less fine, despite showing what John and I felt were typical signs of me now being over 60 years old.  He felt I should have a good chance to make a recovery that might mean I could eventually get back to some amount of full running again, something my GP had also said after he saw the scan results.
  • J] In the first session with John after the “breakthrough” event as outlined in the previous item above, but still some time before the MRI scan results had arrived as also described in the previous item, John found a further possible cause of the knee issues – some tensions to the left of the joints in the lower spine.  He took a “before” photo of my back that showed my upper body was leaning to the right by a significant amount (around 1.5 inches at the neck), then he got me on the treatment couch and worked out these tensions, and then he took an “after” photo, which showed that I was now standing straight.  He was convinced this and the resulting “lockup” of several of the joints of the lower spine, was also a major contributor to my knee issues.  The knee did improve after his work manipulating the lower back, confirming what he had said.  That work also resulted in my upper body becoming more “evenly” aligned – joints were “popping” evenly on the left and right sides when I did the usual morning stretches and exercises, and so on.  Over the weeks following his manipulation work, I took 2 further photos of my back at home, using a delayed 10 second timer on my camera so I could get into position.  After using the computer to make adjustments to these photos to correct for perspective, they confirmed what I had been feeling – I was still standing up straight, so John’s work seemed to have “stuck” and was permanent.  A recent view of my back has also confirmed that it is still straight.
  • K] After the session outlined in the previous item above, we had a further, “penultimate” one on  02 Jan 2017, in which we had a review of all work so far, John re-checked for range of motion, and so on.  The MRI scan results were not in yet, but it seemed a good idea to take a fresh look at everything we had undertaken, up to that point.  As a result of these fresh checks, John carried out further manipulations on the remainder of my spine, all the way from the lowest joints he had addressed in the previous session, to the neck at the top.  There were no further significant tensions that he felt might be causing or contributing to the knee issues, but he did find some other, more minor tight spots, which he was able to “undo”.
  • L] By the time of our final session together, which was on 20 Feb 2017, the MRI scan results had arrived.  We discussed the results, John repeated the checks from 7 weeks ago, he showed me a new exercise for the “tibiofibular joint” as indicated by the scan, and we talked about recovery and about the physiology of the leg joint in general, and about my affected joint.  John felt I could start experimenting with short distances of running, keeping a close eye on how this felt, both during and afterwards, backing off if there were any issues, etc.
  • M] For a few weeks after that final session, I was reluctant to push the knee and so kept away from any running, just tried a little jogging for a few hundred yards now and then, which seemed fine.  I was going on instinct, and eventually took a proper run around the end of March.  By then the joint had gradually improved enough that there were no problems on that run, and since then I have been able to quickly get the distance all the way back up to my previous 4 miles on any given run.  I have lost a fair bit of runner’s conditioning, but it looks like this may return relatively quickly as well, perhaps due to me having continued the usual morning exercises throughout the treatment period in my work with John, as well as having kept playing at least some table tennis for most of that period, recently adding more of this , and averaging more duration in each table tennis session recently as well.

So that’s really about it in terms of my work with John.  I would highly recommend him, based on everything we have done together over the last 6 months.  He has succeeded in helping me to get back to running again, and the things he and I have done as outlined above, mean I have a good chance of being able to keep running for some time to come.

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